BP #11

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/11/11/opinion/the-risks-of-frances-big-new-database.html?partner=rssnyt&emc=rss&_r=0

The Risks of France’s Big New Database

This article is talking about France and their government. France wants to put all their citizens’ information into one data base in hopes to prevent identity theft, and fraud. However this come with a very high concern and price, hacking. The Secure Electronic Documents database, AKA T.E.S., will contain bio-metric information: Id photos, names, addresses, and marital statuses. “One big issue is that the database could easily be checked against information, like video footage, collected by intelligence agencies.” However, “government claims the new database will be used only to confirm identities, it rejected a proposal for individual data chips in passports and identity cards that would serve the same purpose without compromising citizens’ rights to privacy.”

This article is an obvious ethical issue because it is violating these citizens’ rights. They have a right to privacy, to a certain extent, and security. This new database would be violating this right because, as stated earlier, they could use passports and do the same thing. The government wants all their important information though. One cannot know the governments true intent behind this database, however it seems to be a vice not a virtue. The government is being dishonest because they have not releases why they will not use passports. The government’s intentions are good but according to utilitarianism intentions don’t matter, only the outcome does. So if this database helps and doesn’t create issues or get hacked then it would have been worth it. If it fails though, the government would not be able to say that they had good intentions of bringing security to the country.

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